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Updating rpm

Often happens when RPMs are carelessly slapped together by third parties. If the new version depends on updated versions of other stuff, the command will fail (obviously).You might try "yum localinstall Virtual Box-..." (yum does first resolve dependencies, and gets whatever is needed).

So, how can I update database of installed software? There's definitely a language barrier issue here -- the rest of this post is going to assume you installed My SQL and Apache through yum, not from source, and then yum update broke on you. If a package is available but cannot be installed, that usually means that one of its dependencies is faulty, which happens often if you have both the i386 and x86_64 versions of a package installed and you somehow end up with different versions.

An Internet search returns many RPM repositories, but if you are looking for RPM packages built by Red Hat, they can be found at the following locations: As you can see, RPM prints out the name of the package and then prints a succession of hash marks as a progress meter while the package is installed.

The signature of a package is checked automatically when installing or upgrading a package.

I have already come up with a few solutions but nothing seems quite right.

To the best of my knowledge, RPM is not designed to permit updating / replacing existing files, so anything that you do is going to be a hack. If

So, how can I update database of installed software? There's definitely a language barrier issue here -- the rest of this post is going to assume you installed My SQL and Apache through yum, not from source, and then yum update broke on you. If a package is available but cannot be installed, that usually means that one of its dependencies is faulty, which happens often if you have both the i386 and x86_64 versions of a package installed and you somehow end up with different versions.

An Internet search returns many RPM repositories, but if you are looking for RPM packages built by Red Hat, they can be found at the following locations: As you can see, RPM prints out the name of the package and then prints a succession of hash marks as a progress meter while the package is installed.

The signature of a package is checked automatically when installing or upgrading a package.

I have already come up with a few solutions but nothing seems quite right.

To the best of my knowledge, RPM is not designed to permit updating / replacing existing files, so anything that you do is going to be a hack. If $1 is 2 or more - then we're upgrading this package and $1 represents the number of packages already installed.

||

So, how can I update database of installed software? There's definitely a language barrier issue here -- the rest of this post is going to assume you installed My SQL and Apache through yum, not from source, and then yum update broke on you. If a package is available but cannot be installed, that usually means that one of its dependencies is faulty, which happens often if you have both the i386 and x86_64 versions of a package installed and you somehow end up with different versions.An Internet search returns many RPM repositories, but if you are looking for RPM packages built by Red Hat, they can be found at the following locations: As you can see, RPM prints out the name of the package and then prints a succession of hash marks as a progress meter while the package is installed.The signature of a package is checked automatically when installing or upgrading a package.I have already come up with a few solutions but nothing seems quite right.To the best of my knowledge, RPM is not designed to permit updating / replacing existing files, so anything that you do is going to be a hack. If $1 is 2 or more - then we're upgrading this package and $1 represents the number of packages already installed.

is 2 or more - then we're upgrading this package and

So, how can I update database of installed software? There's definitely a language barrier issue here -- the rest of this post is going to assume you installed My SQL and Apache through yum, not from source, and then yum update broke on you. If a package is available but cannot be installed, that usually means that one of its dependencies is faulty, which happens often if you have both the i386 and x86_64 versions of a package installed and you somehow end up with different versions.

An Internet search returns many RPM repositories, but if you are looking for RPM packages built by Red Hat, they can be found at the following locations: As you can see, RPM prints out the name of the package and then prints a succession of hash marks as a progress meter while the package is installed.

The signature of a package is checked automatically when installing or upgrading a package.

I have already come up with a few solutions but nothing seems quite right.

To the best of my knowledge, RPM is not designed to permit updating / replacing existing files, so anything that you do is going to be a hack. If $1 is 2 or more - then we're upgrading this package and $1 represents the number of packages already installed.

||

So, how can I update database of installed software? There's definitely a language barrier issue here -- the rest of this post is going to assume you installed My SQL and Apache through yum, not from source, and then yum update broke on you. If a package is available but cannot be installed, that usually means that one of its dependencies is faulty, which happens often if you have both the i386 and x86_64 versions of a package installed and you somehow end up with different versions.An Internet search returns many RPM repositories, but if you are looking for RPM packages built by Red Hat, they can be found at the following locations: As you can see, RPM prints out the name of the package and then prints a succession of hash marks as a progress meter while the package is installed.The signature of a package is checked automatically when installing or upgrading a package.I have already come up with a few solutions but nothing seems quite right.To the best of my knowledge, RPM is not designed to permit updating / replacing existing files, so anything that you do is going to be a hack. If $1 is 2 or more - then we're upgrading this package and $1 represents the number of packages already installed.

represents the number of packages already installed.

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Are you using the Fedora supplied RPM's or using something compiled by the VBox team?

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